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Music glossary

Blues: secular folk music originating in the South and created by African Americans in the early twentieth century.

Blues. (2019). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from https://academic.eb.com/levels/collegiate/article/blues/15780

 

Hot jazz:  a blend between ragtime, blues, and brass band marches originating in New Orleans, migrating to and evolving further in Chicago.

Verity, M. (2017) Everything You Never Knew About Hot Jazz. ThoughtCo.  Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/hot-jazz-2039523

 

Jazz:  often improvisational musical form developed by African Americans partially from ragtime and blues; characterized by syncopated rhythms and deliberate deviations of pitch.

Jazz. (2019). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from https://academic.eb.com/levels/collegiate/article/jazz/110142

 

Minstrelsy: American theatrical form based primarily on the comic representation of racial stereotypes popular from late 19th to early 20th century that influenced vaudeville, music, radio, television, and film.

Minstrel show. (2019). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from https://academic.eb.com/levels/collegiate/article/minstrel-show/476810

 

Novelty music:  popular music, often humorous, that is unique from other popularly consumed music.  Novelty songs are often linked to the comic song tradition of British Music Hall and Variety shows as well as American Vaudeville.  Novelty piano style has ties to ragtime piano style, sometimes called novelty ragtime, and developed as a sped of parody of ragtime piano.

Novelty song. (2019). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from https://academic.eb.com/levels/collegiate/article/novelty-song/117589
History of Ragtime. [Online Text] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200035811/

 

Stride piano:  similar to ragtime or novelty piano, and was developed in and around Harlem, New York during the 1910s, primarily by African American pianists. 

History of Ragtime. [Online Text] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200035811/

 

Vaudeville:  a farce with music, popular in the U.S. from 1890-1930.  It included several unrelated acts including acrobatics, juggling, magicians, comedians, trained animals, singers, and dancers.

Vaudeville. (2019). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from https://academic.eb.com/levels/collegiate/article/vaudeville/74912