USF Libraries | Special & Digital Collections | Exhibits

A Brief Description of Gypsy Culture, Part I

Dublin Core

Title

A Brief Description of Gypsy Culture, Part I

Subject

Romanies -- Social life and customs.

Description

Oral history video clip featuring Anne Sutherland, Professor, Macalester College. This video was originally produced by Media Entertainment, Inc., for the 2000 documentary The Genocide Factor.

Creator

Media Entertainment, Inc.

Source

Genocide Factor Collection, Oral History Program, Tampa Library, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.

Publisher

Tampa, Fla. : University of South Florida Tampa Library.

Date

1999-07-27

Contributor

Sutherland, Anne
Caitlin, Norma

Relation

G36-00024
Tape number: 4037D

Format

video / mp4

Language

English

Type

Oral History

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Interviewer

Caitlin, Norma

Interviewee

Sutherland, Anne

Location

Rice University, Houston, Texas

Transcription

The Roma are different from the majority of populations they live in, in a number of ways. They have their own religion, they have their own language, they have their own way of dealing with problems. They generally are nomadic; although in Kosovo, for example, the Gypsies were settled Gypsies. Mother Teresa comes from that population of Albanian-speaking Boyash Gypsies.

So there are Gypsies who become wonderful people, and then there are Gypsies who are viewed as scum, and so you get the whole range. But, they live differently in a lot of ways, and they are very secretive and keep to themselves, and that makes people suspicious of them. I think some of the same -- you know, marrying each other, for example, only, if they can -- same with the Jewish population. Separateness often breeds suspicion. It shouldn't, but it does.

The Roma are extremely close to each other. They have large, very tightly knit communities and families, large extended families. They are -- most Gypsies, almost all Gypsies, are honest and lead good lives. If they are involved in crime, it's most often petty kinds of crimes that are not violent. I think the violence against them may lead them to become more violent themselves. I hope that doesn't happen.

But they are, at the moment, in what I would consider -- at least in Eastern Europe -- the third diaspora of Gypsies. That is, the first was when they left India a thousand years ago; the second was the Nazi persecution in World War II; and the third is today, the post communist period since 1989, in which it's been a kind of free-for-all in Eastern Europe and the Gypsies have become a target again for persecution.

Original Format

Beta tape

Duration

2:48

Citation

Media Entertainment, Inc., “A Brief Description of Gypsy Culture, Part I,” USF Library Special & Digital Collections Exhibits, accessed September 20, 2019, http://exhibits.lib.usf.edu/items/show/337.

Geolocation