USF Libraries | Special & Digital Collections | Exhibits

American Foreign Policy and Genocide

Dublin Core

Title

American Foreign Policy and Genocide

Subject

Genocide.
United States -- Dept. of State.
Clinton, Bill (1946- )

Description

Oral history video clip featuring David Scheffer, United States Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues. This video was originally produced by Media Entertainment, Inc., for the 2000 documentary The Genocide Factor.

Creator

Media Entertainment, Inc.

Source

Genocide Factor Collection, Oral History Program, Tampa Library,
University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.

Publisher

Tampa, Fla. : University of South Florida Tampa Library.

Date

1999-09-08

Contributor

Scheffer, David

Relation

G36-00066
Tape number: 4060F

Format

video / mp4

Language

English

Type

Oral History

Coverage

United States.

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Interviewer

Prior, Cecily

Interviewee

Scheffer, David

Location

United States Department of State, Washington D.C.

Transcription

There’s no question that geopolitics in the past has wrought very disastrous consequences for large numbers of people, and I don’t know if there’s really any way to rewrite history at this stage. Various interests were factored by policymakers at various points in time; they were under different constraints and different circumstances. But I think what’s different today from even twenty, thirty years ago is that the issue of war crimes, the issue of atrocities, of genocide, is becoming increasingly prominent in decision-making and in how we react to situations overseas. We don’t simply look at a situation in terms of balance of power, or how this particular region of the world fits into the overall scheme of American foreign policy. It’s a very different calculation today. And that doesn’t mean we always get it right. It doesn’t mean we can prevent all the killings. That doesn’t mean that every step we take is without any criticism at all from other parties for not focusing on what they think we should be focusing on. But, I think it’s unquestioned that—particularly under the leadership of President Clinton and this administration—we have tried to focus our foreign policy increasingly on factors which are becoming dominant factors in how the international community views these types of crises around the world. And what that focus is, is what is the impact on humanity, what is happening to civilians, what is happening to the landscape of that country, what kind of destruction is taking place, what kind of crimes are being committed on the ground; not simply which government must survive, which government must not survive. And that’s a very important part of all of the decision-making that we make. And I think the good news is that that issue is foursquare on the table now; it’s on the table every time we look at a situation. And I’m not so sure if thirty, forty, fifty years ago you could have made the same representation that that is always on the table when you look at a crisis.

Original Format

Beta tape

Duration

3:09

Citation

Media Entertainment, Inc., “American Foreign Policy and Genocide,” USF Library Special & Digital Collections Exhibits, accessed January 16, 2019, http://exhibits.lib.usf.edu/items/show/730.

Geolocation